Squash and “Oc-tuber” Delights

Hello members, welcome to week 20! The ides of October are more auspicious than the ides of March. We have a tutorial on making your own pumpkin puree. We found six good recipes, all in pairs, and we couldn’t “pare” them down, so here are the pairs: a pair of pumpkin recipes, a pair of delicata squash recipes, and a pair of root vegetable mashes (parsnips and celeriac).  Pairs all around!

Homemade Pumpkin Puree Tutorial (works for other squash that you want to puree as well)

  1. Wash pumpkin, snap off the stem.
  2. Use a sharp knife to cut pumpkin in half horizontally.
  3. Scrape out guts with a large metal serving spoon.
  4. Separate the seeds from the guts to make a batch of roasted pumpkin seeds.  Discard the guts (compost if you can).
  5. Cut pumpkin halves into 1-2 inch cubes.
  6. In a large pot, place 1 inch of water on the stove over medium heat.  Lightly salt and add pumpkin cubes.  Bring to a simmer and reduce to medium low. Put the lid slightly ajar and allow pumpkin to steam for about 15 minutes or until tender.
  7. Remove pot from heat, drain using a colander, let pumpkin cool.  Remove the rind from each pumpkin cube using a fork. Discard the rind.
  8. Puree the pumpkin meat in a food processor until smooth.  Return the puree to the same pot and simmer on medium low until liquid has cooked off, stirring occasionally to prevent burning.
  9. May be frozen if not using immediately.

Pumpkin Maple Vinaigrette

  • 1/4 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 medium clove of garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 cup EVOO
  • 1 Tbsp water
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp fresh thyme leaves coarsely chopped
  1. Combine pumpkin puree, cider vinegar, maple syrup, mustard, garlic, salt and pepper in a medium bowl or a glass jar. Whisk well to combine.
  2. Add olive oil slowly in a thin stream, whisking continually.
  3. Add fresh thyme and stir well.  Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Pumpkin Honey Cornbread

  • 1/4 cup melted butter
  • 1/3 cup of sugar
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/4 pumpkin puree
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup flour
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a medium bowl, stir butter, sugar, and honey together.  Whisk in the egg.  Whisk in the baking soda, buttermilk, and pumpkin puree.  Add salt, cornmeal and flour.  Do not overmix.
  3. Add batter to a greased 8 inch baking dish.  Bake for 25 minutes or until top is golden brown.  Serve with additional honey and butter if desired.

 

Kale Stuffed Delicata Squash

kalestuffeddelicata

Serves 4

  • 2 medium apples, peeled, cored, finely chopped
  • 2 delicata squashes, medium to large, cut in half lengthwise and seeds removed
  • 2 medium cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 bunch of kale, rinsed, thick stems removed, and shredded
  • 2 leeks, medium to large (or onions), white and light green parts only, split in half lengthwise, sliced into 1/4 inch half moons
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 eggs
  • salt and pepper
  • 4 Tbsp EVOO
  • 3/4 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1 Tbsp unsalted butter, cut into 8 small cubes
  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese
  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat 375 degrees. Rub squash with 1 Tbsp oil and lightly season with salt and pepper.  Then lay on a baking dish. If squash halved do not sit flat, use a vegetable peeler to peel a strip or two away from the bottom so that squash lays flat. Bake until flesh is tender, about 25 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare the stuffing.  Heat remaining olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat until shimmering.  Add apples and leeks, stirring occasionally until lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic, raisins, and thyme, cook another 1-2 minutes.  Reduce heat to medium, add kale, cover the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, 5-7 minutes until kale is mostly wilted. Transfer mixture to a large bowl and let cool slightly.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. Add cottage cheese, eggs, bread crumbs and parmesan. Mix well.  Remove squash from oven, divide filling equally among four halves.  Sprinkle squash with additional bread crumbs and parmesan, and dot each squash half with 2 cubes of butter.  Any leftover stuffing can be baked in a grease baking dish alongside. Bake until squash is tender, and stuffing is lightly browned.

Delicata Squash and Tofu Curry

Serves 4

  • 1 delicata squash, halved, seeded, and cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 2 tsp fresh ginger
  • 8 cups of kale or chard, tough stems removed
  • 1 medium onion, halved and sliced
  • 14 oz package of extra firm tofu
  • 14 oz can light coconut milk
  • 1 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp light brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp curry powder
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 4 tsp canola oil

*Delicata squash skin is thin and tender when cooked, so no need to peel it.

  1. Combine curry powder, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Blot tofu dry with paper towel, cut into 1 inch cubes. Toss tofu in a medium bowl with 1 tsp of the spice mixture.
  2. Heat 2 tsp of oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add tofu and cook, stirring every 2 minutes until browned, 6-8 minutes total. Transfer to a plate.
  3. Heat remaining 2 tsp of oil over medium high heat. Add squash, onion, ginger, and remaining spice mixture.  Cook until vegetables are lightly browned, 4-5 minutes.  Add coconut milk and brown sugar, bring to a boil. Add half the kale or chard and cook until slightly wilted, about 1 minute. Stir in the rest of the greens and cook another minute.  Return tofu to the pan, cover and cook, stirring once or twice, until squash and greens are tender, 3-5 minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in lime juice. Recommended: serve with quinoa or brown rice.

Garlic Mashed Parsnips

  • 1 lb. parsnips
  • 1/3-1/2 cup canned coconut milk (or dairy milk if you have that on hand)
  • 1 tsp garlic powder (or fresh garlic)
  • 1 tsp dried parsley (or fresh)
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil or olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Peel and chop the parsnip like you would a carrot.
  2. Boil the parsnips until tender, then drain.  Add in the other ingredients and mash, using an immersion blender, hand masher, processor, or your favorite method of pulverization.
  3. Serve with butter or olive oil.

Celeriac and Parsnip Mash

  • 1 medium celeriac, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 3 medium parsnips, peeled and cut into 1 inch slices
  • 1 large russet potato, peeled and quartered
  • 1/4 cup vegetable or chicken broth (see the previous posts about how to make your own vegetable broth/stock!)
  • 2 Tbsp EVOO
  • 3 Tbsp chopped fresh chives
  • 2 Tbsp low-fat or non-fat yogurt
  • 1 1/2 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  1. Place celeriac and parsnips in a large sauce pan and cover with lightly salted water.  Place potato in a medium sauce pan and cover with lightly salted water.  Bring both sauce pans to a boil over medium high heat.  Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer gently, about 20 minutes for the potato and 30-40 for the celeriac and parsnips.
  2. When potato is tender, drain and transfer to a large bowl.  Mash with a masher and covered with foil. When the celeriac and parsnips are tender, drain and transfer to a food processor, blend until smooth.  Add the puree to the mashed potato.
  3. Meanwhile, combine broth and oil in a sauce pan.  Heat on the stove until steaming.  Stir in the puree along with 2 Tbsp chives, yogurt, mustard, salt and pepper.  Stir in parmesan, garnish with remaining 1 Tbsp of chives.

Waitin’ For A “Soup-er”man

Hello members, welcome to week 15!  This week’s title comes from a Flaming Lips song called “Waitin’ For A Superman.” I suggest you check it out on Youtube. The arrival of celery in the share last week inspired us to find a vegetable stock recipe, and two simple soups that you can then use the stock with.  We also found an Autumn themed salad that calls for Michigan pears, and some mini omelettes that are great for using up leftover veggies.

 

Vegetable Stock

This recipe comes from a cooking class I took on soups and stocks.  Chef Jim LaPerriere was the teacher, and his recipe credits the CIA Professional Chef Book.  There are many variations you can make on vegetable stock, and because veggies yield their flavor sooner than meat bones, you can make vegetable stock in about an hour. That means you can try several stocks in an afternoon and freeze them for winter soup later.

Yield: 1 quart veggie stock, consider double or triple the recipe if making stock to freeze.

  • 2 fl. oz. vegetable oil
  • 4 oz. sliced onions
  • 4 oz. chopped leeks
  • 2 oz. celery
  • 2 oz. green cabbage
  • 2 oz chopped carrots
  • 2 oz. chopped tomato
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 1/2 qt. cold water
  • Herb sachet: place 2-3 parsley stems, 1/2 tsp thyme, 1/2 tsp black pepper, 1 bay leaf, 1 garlic clove, 1 tsp fennel seeds in a section of cheesecloth, wrap into a pouch and tie with baker’s twine
  1. Heat oil in a soup pot, and add vegetables.
  2. Cover and sweat the vegetables 3-5 minutes.
  3. Add the water and sachet; simmer for 30-40 minutes.
  4. Strain the stock.  It is ready for soup-making now, or you may cool it and freeze for later use.
  5. Try variations: use parsnips in place of carrots, try more or less celery, add fennel fronds or ginger to herbs.  Also try roasting veggies first before simmering with water for a roasted flavor.

Autumn Chopped Salad

Serves 4-6

  • 6-8 cups chopped romaine lettuce (or whatever is on hand from the share)
  • 2 medium pears chopped (look for Michigan pears at the farmer’s market soon)
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 cupped chopped pecans
  • 8 slices of bacon, crisped and crumbled
  • 4-6 oz feta cheese
  • For the dressing: try a combination of 2/3 cup poppyseed and 1/3 cup balsamic vinaigrette.
  1. In  a large bowl, combine lettuce, pears, cranberries, pecans, bacon, and feta.
  2. Drizzle generously with dressing.
  3. Serve in fancy salad bowls if you’re feeling fancy, or regular bowls work fine too.

Muffin Tin Omelettes

miniomelettestray miniomeletteplate

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 1/2 sweet or yellow onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup spinach, chopped (or greens you have on hand)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • add other veggies of your choice: diced tomatoes, potatoes, summer squash/zucchini, broccoli
  • shredded or crumbled cheese, optional
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Spray a muffin tin with cooking spray.
  2. Chop all vegetables, saute in a skillet with the olive oil, about 3-5 minutes.
  3. Whisk eggs together in a mixing bowl.
  4. Pour vegetables into egg mixture (and cheese if using).
  5. Pour mixture into muffin tin cells.
  6. Bake 20-30 minutes, or until liquid is cooked off the eggs.
  7.  Enjoy warm or put into freezer bag for convenient meals later.  If freezing, microwave omelettes for 2 minutes to reheat.

Classic Creamy Carrot Soup

This recipe calls for 2 lbs. of carrots, which is about 2 bunches from CSA pickup.  If you are short, consider halving the recipe. Or head on down to Holland or Fulton St Market and get some more Groundswell carrots.  Each rainbow bunch is lovingly crafted by a hardworking Groundswell employee.

  • 2 lbs. of carrots, peeled and cut into 1 inch pieces
  • 3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  • 32 oz. chicken broth (or veggie broth)
  • 2 strips precooked bacon (optional)
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp hot sauce (optional)
  1. Place oil in a large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add carrots, onion, garlic, thyme, and rosemary.
  3. Cook for 15 minutes until carrots are fork tender.
  4. Remove herb sprigs, transfer vegetables to a blender or use an immersion blender to puree.
  5. Add broth, continue to puree.
  6. Transfer to large saucepan over medium heat, add bacon strips.
  7. Season with salt, pepper, and hot sauce.  Simmer until ready to serve. Serves 6.

Creamy Thai Carrot Soup

  • 1/2 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 lb. carrots, peeled and chopped, about 4 cups
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 cups veggie stock plus 2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup creamy or crunchy natural peanut butter
  • 2 tsp chili garlic sauce
  • For toppings: fresh basil, cilantro, or mint, coconut milk, brown sugar or agave. And Sriracha hot sauce for an extra kick.
  1. Heat a large pot over medium heat.
  2. Dice onion and garlic, add to pot with 1 Tbsp coconut or olive oil. Add carrots and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Season with salt and pepper, add veggie stock and water, stir.
  4. Bring to a low boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes, or until veggies are tender.
  5. Transfer to blender or use an immersion blender, blend until smooth and creamy.
  6. Add peanut butter and chili garlic sauce, blend.
  7. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. You may add brown sugar or agave for sweetness.
  8. Serve with fresh basil or herbs of your choice. Drizzle with coconut milk, or add Sriracha sauce for extra heat.

Easy Back-to-School, Labor Day Recipes

Hello members, welcome to week 14.  This week we have a pork roast with salsa verde, but also four recipes that are vegetarian/vegan friendly.  Two recipes make use of slow cookers, and one is a “all-in-one-pot” recipe for families who will be starting school this week.  Enjoy!

Zucchini Hummus

  • 1.5 lbs zucchin, grilled or roasted
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 1/8 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup Tahini
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp cracked black pepper
  • 1/4 cup fresh herbs: mint, parsley, or both (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil for garnish
  1. Grill or roast the zucchini in strips ahead of time, about 15 minutes cooking time. Wrap them in foil after done to steam them for a few more minutes.
  2. When cooled, place zucchini, along with other ingredients in a food processor. Puree until relatively smooth.  Transfer to a serving bowl, make a little well with a spoon in the middle to drizzle the olive oil into.  Serve with sliced veggies, pita chips, or more zucchini strips (so meta!).

Chili Verde Tacos

  • 2 lb pork roast
  • 6 tomatillos
  • 1/2 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 1 7 oz can of salsa verde (store bought or home made)
  • 1 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • soft taco shells
  • toppings: cilantro and chopped onion, cheese and sour cream, your choice
  1. Spray a medium size crock pot with cooking oil.  Place the roast in crock pot, season with salt and pepper.
  2. In a medium saucepan heat 2 Tbsp oil. Add onions and garlic and cook until transparent.
  3. Add salsa verde and oregano to pan, stir.
  4. Put tomatillos in blender with just enough water to cover them, blend until liquified.
  5. Pour the onion, salsa, oregano mixture over the pork roast. Pour the blended tomatillos over the park roast.
  6. Cook on high for one hour, then change to low for 6 hours.
  7. Shred pork with a fork and cook on low for one more hour.
  8. Serve pok in your favorite taco shells with your favorite toppings.

Slow Cooker Tomato Sauce (The Tom Carey Method) For Freezing

slowcookertomatoes slowcookertomatosauce

When I used to work at Groundswell, Tom and I would discuss the finer points of life, including how to make tomato sauce.  Tom told me you can put whole tomatoes in a slow cooker overnight without the lid on.  At first I didn’t believe him, and said “No way!” and he said “Way! Now get back to work!” I think is how the exchange went.  So that night I went home, took some tomatoes, and a slow cooker, and made my first batch of tomato sauce that I would freeze.

  • 5 lbs. of tomatoes, or however many you have on hand
  • one slow cooker
  • one hand mixer, processor or blender
  1. wash the tomatoes, peel or cut any bad spots out, and  the core if you want.
  2. Place the tomatoes in the slow cooker, stacking as many as you can.
  3. Turn the slow cooker on low, with the lid off, and leave overnight.
  4. In the morning you can mash the tomatoes with a masher and leave them to cook more, or transfer the tomatoes to a stock pot on the stove.
  5. Cook the tomatoes down on either the slow cooker or stove top. Use a hand mixer to blend up the skins and seeds, or put the sauce in the blender/processor to blend up the skins/seeds.  When you have a sauce consistency you like, let it cool for a few minutes, then  pour into quart bags, close carefully, and freeze.
  6. This winter, when you need tomato sauce, grab a bag of frozen sauce, reheat, add dried herbs, and enjoy!

When I told Tom the slow cooker method worked really well, he said “Of course it did! Try it with a bunch of cherry tomatoes! Now get back to work!”

(Editor’s note: Tom Carey is a great guy and encourages employees and only uses positive reinforcement when encouraging employees to be more productive.)

Green Bean, Cherry Tomato, and Cheddar Salad

(credit: cabotcheese.coop/legacy)

  • 4 cups green beans, trimmed
  • 3 Tbsp plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • 2 tsp white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder, or 1 chopped garlic clove
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 6 oz cheddar cheese, cut in small cubes
  • 2 Tbsp chopped basil
  1. Bring a pot of lightly salted water to boil.  Add green beans and cook until crisp-tender, about 3 to 4 minutes.
  2. Whisk yogurt, mayo, vinegar, salt and pepper, and garlic in a mixing bowl.
  3. Add the green beans, tomatoes, and cheddar to dressing bowl, toss.
  4. Serve with chopped basil.

Amazing One Pot Pasta

  • 16 oz box of linguini, or your favorite pasta
  • 2 cups cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 cloves fresh garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 sprigs fresh basil, roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 5 cups of chicken broth (or vegetable broth)
  • 1 bunch of spinach (or salad greens)
  • grated parmesan cheese for serving
  1. In a large pot, bring all ingredients (except for basil, spinach, and parmesan) to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently to prevent sticking.
  2. Continue to boil pasta until al dente, about 9 minutes for linguini. Stir often.
  3. Add basil and spinach, cook one more minute until greens begin to wilt.
  4. Season with more salt and pepper if desired.
  5. Serve in bowls, garnish with parmesan and more basil.

 

 

My Dear, You look simply radishing…

It’s CSA Week 6! We have 3 recipes that feature radishes. We also included some ideas for how to freeze your garlic scapes, and a nice comfort food dish – Creamy Broccoli Cheddar Rice – that is so quick and easy to make.

Chinese Cabbage and Radish Greens Stir Fry

Serves 2.  This makes for a good breakfast stir fry if you are looking for ways to eat greens.  You can always cook more greens in a bigger pot for leftovers to go in lunches or eat cold at other breakfasts.  Summer is a good time to give oatmeal a break, wouldn’t you agree?

  • 4 cups of Chinese cabbage, chopped into 1 inch squares or strips
  • 2 cups of radish greens (or any small greens like mizuna, yukina savoy, or spinach) torn into bite size pieces
  • 2 garlic scapes
  • 2 scallions, or half of an onion
  • 2 Tbsp cooking oil of your choice (this weekend I used leftover bacon grease)
  • 1 Tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp dijon mustard
  • 2 Tbsp barbecue sauce
  1. In a frying pan (such as a cast iron skillet) heat the cooking oil over medium-high heat. When drops of water sizzle in the pan, add chopped garlic scapes and scallions, cook for 2 minutes.
  2. Add Chinese cabbage, fry pieces until they are translucent or look softer, about 3 minutes
  3. Add radish greens, fry until they begin to wilt.
  4. For the sauce, mix the vinegar, mustard, BBQ sauce in a bowl with 2-4 Tbsp of water.  Add 1 tsp of corn starch if desired, then add to pan.
  5. Stir the sauce in with the veggies for 1 minute, then remove from heat and pair with rice or quinoa.

Creamy Broccoli Cheddar Rice

Serves 4

  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped (or scallions)
  • 1 tsp minced garlic (or scapes)
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup jasmine rice
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups of broccoli, chopped
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium heat.  Add onion and garlic, saute for 2 minutes, stir as needed.
  2. Add broth to same pan, bring to a boil.  Add the jasmine rice, cover and reduce heat to low.  Cook 12 minutes while stirring occasionally.
  3. After 12 minutes, remove cover, stir, add butter, water, salt and pepper, and simmer 3 minutes.
  4. After 3 minutes, add broccoli.  Let cook on low for 4-5 minutes or when broccoli has desired tenderness.
  5. Add cheese and stir, then serve.

Freezing Garlic Scapes

Feeling stumped by your garlic scapes? They are some of the most beautiful foods I have ever seen, their  graceful curls remind me of swans for some reason. We’ve been blessed with a bountiful harvest of these lovelies – more than our household is able to eat in a week. We know garlic scape pesto is a go-to for lots of CSA members, and that’s great. Pesto is not my personal favorite, so I prefer to use them wherever I would usually use chopped garlic clove. I think it’s a little more mild tasting than cloves – so use more than 1 scape to equal one clove. After doing some research, we found what look like two great ways to freeze your scapes, so you can enjoy them year-round.  These would be great to use for browning beef when making spaghetti sauce, use in an egg dish, roast and add to mashed potatoes, add to a soup, etc.

Type 1 : Blanching

1. Cut the scapes into .5-1″ pieces. Steam blanch them for about 3 minutes.  (If you Freeze them in freezer bags. To prevent them from getting stuck together, you may want to initially freeze them in a single layer on a baking sheet, and then transfer them to a freezer bag.

Type 2: Freezing in cubes with oil

1. Wash and chop the scapes into small pieces. Fill an ice cube tray with the scapes – you want to pack them as tight as you can. Pour olive oil over the scapes to fill the empty spaces. Freeze, and then remove the cubes and tranfer to a freezer bag.

Roasted Radishes

Roasting radishes is a great way to take some of the spice away, making them more appealing to more sensitive palates. Think of them as tiny little potatoes.

  • 1 bunch of radishes
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1-2  sprigs fresh rosemary
  •  salt and pepper to taste
  1. Preheat the oven to 400-425 degrees.
  2. Wash and dry the radishes.
  3. Place radishes on a roasting pan or cookie sheet. Lightly coat with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper along with  minced/crushed rosemary leaves. Cook for 20-25 minutes.

Or – you can use them in these delicious Roasted Radish and Chickpea Tacos with Avocado. 

Coleslaw

Serves 8. This coleslaw is so good! It’s even better the following day, it seems the flavors are absorbed more fully into the cabbage.

  • 1/2 head of red cabbage, small
  • 1/2 head of green cabbage, small (or pick one color and use the whole cabbage)
  • 2 whole green apples, chopped
  • 1 bunch of radishes
  • 2 small carrots

for the dressing (This makes enough for 2 batches of coleslaw)

  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp poppyseeds (optional)
  • 1 cup canola oil (We usually use grape seed oil instead)
  1. Chop or shred and combine ingredients in a bowl.
  2. To make the dressing: shake ingredients well in a jar, then pour over cabbage mixture.

 

Soup Weather with a little hope for some Indian Summer

Despite absolutely glorious weather for the last 2 weeks, today definitely feels like winter may be right around the corner. This weather makes me want nice thick, homemade soup for lunch/dinner and to store some in the freezer so that when I don’t have as many wonderful fresh vegetables available to me, I can pull out a homemade batch of soup. Both of the following soups can be prepared and then frozen for a later meal. For the pumpkin soup, you could substitute butternut squash, buttercup squash or calabaza for the pumpkin if necessary.
Pumpkin Pear Soup
1 pie pumpkin, about 2.5 pounds, baked and chopped (see below for instructions)
1 cup diced carrots
1 cup diced celery
1 cup diced onion
2 pears, peeled, cored and diced
2 Tablespoons butter
3 cans (or about 40 ounces) chicken/vegetable broth
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1 Tablespoon maple syrup
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 cup cream
1/2 teaspoon cardamom
To prepare the pumpkin or which ever squash is being used, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut the pumpkin into quarters. Put on baking sheet and roast for about 45 minutes or until tender. Let cool and then peel. Now you can chop it up for the recipe.
Cook carrots, celery, onion and pears in butter in a large pot for 10 minutes. Add the broth, nutmeg, cinnamon, syrup, salt and pepper and pumpkin. Simmer for 30 minutes. Cool slightly. Puree with a stick blender or in a blender (if you use a blender and it is still hot, remember to take out the insert in the top and hold a clean dish towel over the opening to allow steam to escape). Return to pan. (If you are going to freeze the soup, this is the time. When you are ready to serve it, heat the soup up and continue the recipe.) Pour 1/2 cup of cream into soup. Beat the rest in a bowl. Stir the cardamom into the whipped cream. To serve, ladle soup into bowls. Dollop with whipped cream.
DSCN3752

Split Pea Soup with Ham (The New Basics Cookbook)
1 pound dried green split peas
5 cups chicken stock
5 cups water
1 meaty ham bone or 2 smoked ham hocks (I prefer the ham bone to the ham hocks)
2 ribs celery, leaves included, diced
3 Tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon crumbled dried tarragon leaves
4 Tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup diced carrots
1 cup diced onions
1 leek (white part only), rinsed and sliced
1 cup slivered fresh spinach leaves
2 Tablespoons dry sherry
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Rinse the split peas in a strainer and then combine them with the stock and water in a large soup pot. Bring to a boil. Add the ham bone, celery, 1 Tablespoon of the parsley and the tarragon. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, partially covered, stirring occasionally for 45 minutes. Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the carrots, onion and leek. Cook until the vegetables are wilted, 10 minutes. Add them to the soup pot, along with the spinach. Simmer, partially covered, 30 minutes.
Remove the soup from the heat. Remove the ham bone and shred the meat from the bone, removing any excess fat. Return the meat to the soup. Add the sherry, pepper and remaining 2 Tablespoons parsley. Heat through and serve immediately.

Another favorite cold weather dish around here is pot pies. Actually I could probably serve this at any point in the year and it would be a hit but I enjoy it more in fall or winter. This recipe is adapted from Moosewood Restaurant New Classic Cookbook. When I was growing up I know I always preferred pot pies that had crust around the whole pie and not just on the top so, rather than do the biscuit topping the original recipe calls for, I use a pie crust and line 4 small oven safe baking dishes. I then pour in the contents and wrap the pie around over the top. I can safely say that it isn’t a work of art but it is gobbled up around here and that is all that I am looking for. You can use any number of different vegetables in the pot pie depending on what you have. I almost always throw in carrots and sometimes green beans. My kids will eat things in a pot pie that they might not eat plain (i.e. sweet potatoes). Last night when I made it, I didn’t have mushrooms so just beefed up the other amounts of vegetables and it worked out just fine.
Homespun Pot Pie (adapted from Moosewood New Classic Cookbook)
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
2 cups coarsely chopped onions
2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried thyme
4 to 5 cups sliced or halved mushrooms
1 tablespoon dijon mustard
2 cups peeled and chopped sweet potatoes
2 cups chopped potatoes
2 cups peeled and chopped parsnips
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
3 cups water or stock
3 Tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 1/2 cup cold water
1 cup fresh or frozen green peas
1 cup fresh or frozen corn kernels
1 Tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt (I omit this salt)
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line four small baking dishes with pie crust. I think you could make as many as six because I always have a fair amount of leftover filling that I use in the following days.
Warm the oil in a soup pot. Add the onions and garlic, cover and cook on medium heat for 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the salt, thyme, mushrooms and mustard. Cook until the mushrooms start to release their juices, about 5 minutes. Add the sweet potatoes, white potatoes, parsnips, black pepper and the water or stock and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes, until the vegetables are just tender. Stir the dissolved cornstarch mixture into the simmering vegetables, stirring constantly. When the liquid starts to thicken, mix in the peas, corn, soy sauce and salt(if using). Pour the vegetables into the prepared baking dishes. Wrap the pie crust over the top. Bake for about 20 minutes or until they start to bubble and the crust is golden.

Sometimes (and some weeks more often than sometimes) I just don’t have my act together and am trying to throw something together at the last minute. This summer I embraced the frittata for dinner when that happened.  I don’t know that there is any one recipe I used so the following recipe is just an example.  A frittata is a good vehicle for extra greens, potatoes, onions, herbs, peppers, zucchini and probably many other vegetables.  I’d cut the following frittata into wedges and serve it with salad or some fresh fruit.  Both of my kids like most things when cooked into a frittata.

Frittata
1 Tablespoon olive oil
4 small new potatoes, quartered
1 small onion, chopped
Handful or two of spinach
3/4 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
2 Tablespoons chives, chopped
5 eggs
1/4 cup milk
Salt
Pepper
Heat olive oil in a 12″ oven-safe skillet over medium heat.  Add potatoes and onions and saute until tender.  Add spinach and cook until just wilted.  Whisk the eggs, milk, chives and salt and pepper to taste.  Lower the heat to medium low and add the egg mixture to the skillet.  Stir quickly to get everything mixed together.  Cook until the bottom is just set and sides are starting to pull away, about 5 minutes.  The top will not be completely cooked yet.  Place the skillet under the broiler and cook for about 3-5 minutes or until the frittata is puffed and set.  Serve immediately with cherry tomatoes sprinkled over the top.

This recipe isn’t very cold weather oriented but maybe we’ll have a few more nice warm days and some fish on the grill will sound good to you.  The original recipe called for packaged slaw.  I always thought I didn’t like coleslaw but then when I made it myself once, I realized how delicious it could be.  I’m sure you can cut it thin enough for slaw but I have a bargain mandolin so use that and it works wonderfully.  We usually put our fish and slaw in tortillas.  My son will eat a mountain of these.

Whitefish with Vegetable Slaw (adapted from The New Grilling Book)
1 pound mahi mahi or tilapia fillets
1 teaspoon finely shredded lime peel
1/4 cup lime juice
1/4 cup snipped fresh cilantro
3 Tablespoons olive oil
1 Tablespoon honey
1 fresh jalepeno, seeded and finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/3 head of green cabbage, thinly sliced
1/3 cup red cabbage, thinly sliced
2 carrots, shredded
1 cup shredded jicama or kohlrabi
Rinse fish. Pat dry.  Place fish in shallow dish.  For dressing, in a small bowl combine lime juice, cilantro, oil, honey, jalepeno, garlic and salt.  Divide mixture in half.  Stir lime peel into one portion of dressing.  Pour dressing with lime peel over fish to marinade.  Marinade about 30 minutes at room temperature.
For slaw, combine cabbages, carrots, jicama and/or kohlrabi.  Pour remaining dressing over slaw and toss to coat.  Chill until time to serve.
Preheat grill.  Grill fish directly over medium coals until fish flakes easily (about 4-6 minutes per half inch of fish).    Serve fish with slaw.
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Late Summer Bounty

We are getting so many absolutely delicious vegetables right now. Though it is wonderful, it can definitely be quite overwhelming at times. Salad is one of the ideas that comes to mind and there are so many options to consider. Getting my kids to eat salads can be a bit of a bear at times. Here are two salads that I have been successful with and that my husband and I love as does company when they come. My son does prefer that you warm these up a little. I think part of what he doesn’t like about “salad” is the cold factor. Alas if they will eat it, I will warm it up. I have also learned to generally go a little lighter on the vinaigrettes and they tend to not notice that it is a “salad.” The following salad is different than the classic mayonnaise potato salad but a big hit with everyone.

Lemon Basil Potato Salad (Southern Living magazine)
2.5 pounds small potatoes, cut into eighths
Olive oil
1/4 cup lemon juice
4 garlic cloves, minced
3/4 cup chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon dijon mustard
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
2/3 cup olive oil
1/2 medium purple onion, chopped
10 thick bacon slices, cooked and crumbled
10 ounces spinach, cut into strips

Arrange potatoes evenly on cookie sheet. Toss in olive oil. Bake at 475 degrees for 20-25 minutes until tender and golden.
Whisk together lemon juice, garlic, basil, mustard, salt and pepper. Whisk in olive oil in slow stream. Gently toss potato and onion with 1/2 cup vinaigrette. Arrange spinach in bowls, drizzle with vinaigrette. Top with potato mixture. Sprinkle with bacon.
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This next salad takes advantage of something in abundance right now, not through the CSA but at the Farmers Market…corn. My husband got me a book several years ago with main and side dish salads. The book has been indispensable. For the most part, the recipes call for things I normally have on hand and so far they have all been delicious. This salad is also popular with my children.

Fresh Corn Salad (from Raising the Salad Bar)
Kernels from 6 ears of fresh corn
1 tomato, seeded and diced
1 firm but ripe avocado, diced
2 scallions, thinly sliced or 2 tablespoons finely chopped red onion
1/4 chopped fresh cilantro

Lime dressing
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1/2 teaspoon freshly minced garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper

In a large serving bowl, remove corn kernels. Combine with the tomato, avocado and scallions. To make the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk together all of the dressing ingredients. Combine the dressing with the salad and gently mix. Garnish with chopped cilantro
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Sometimes I am not out to please the family but simply to enjoy the fresh produce at hand. That would be the case for the recipe. My husband and I end up eating this for dinner probably twice a week when heirloom tomatoes are at their peak. My kids don’t understand why would would dream of eating this but I LOVE it. It is adapted from a recipe I found in Gourmet magazine years ago. When I first made it, I’d never had heirloom tomatoes and didn’t appreciate how wonderful this dish is. Now I love all of the colors and textures combining together. I believe the original recipe called for bleu cheese but I am not a fan so have changed it to what I enjoy and can find at the Holland Farmers market.

Heirloom Tomato Salad with Goat Cheese
8 1/2inch thich slices of good crusty bread
4 large garlic cloves, halved
3 tablespoons plus 1/3 cup olive oil
1 cup currant, grape, cherry or pear tomatoes
1/2 cup chopped green onions
10 medium heirloom tomatoes cored, thinly sliced
1 small onion, sliced paper thin
3 celery stalks, sliced thin on diagonal
1.5 cups crumbled goat cheese
Prepare grill to medium high. Rub bread with garlic and brush with 3 tablespoons olive oil. I have been known to do the previous step in a hot frying pan. Maybe not the same but quick and tasty regardless. Combine remaining 1/3 cup olive oil, currant tomatoes and green onions in medium bowl. Toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Overlap tomato slices in circles on platter, alternating colors. Scatter onion and celery slices over tomatoes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Spoon tomato and green onion mixture over top. Sprinkle with cheese. Grill bread or use frying pan, two minutes per side. Pile salad on bread and enjoy the yummy messiness!
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As always when I have ingredients that I don’t know what to do with, I end up trying epicurious.com. They did not let me down with this delicious cabbage soup recipe that is a hit with the entire family. The original recipe has a lemon creme fraiche topping but we do not do the topping. We just stick with the soup itself so if you think the soup would benefit from a lemon creme fraiche topping, just look it up on epicurious.com. At this point in August, I am not in the mood for a heavy thick soup but I freeze this and then can thaw it in January when I am most assuredly in the mood for this soup. Because of this, the soup doesn’t usually have the garnish of sauteed cabbage but we enjoy it nonetheless. Pair it with some nice crusty bread and lunch is served.

Potato, Cabbage, Leek Soup (from Bon Appetit)
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
6 cups diced green cabbage (from about 1/2 of medium head or a whole small head)
3 cups chopped leeks (white and pale green only, 3-4 large)
3 garlic cloves, pressed
3 cups 1/2 inch cubed, peeled potatoes (about 1.25 pounds)
1 2×2 piece Parmesan rind (optional)
1 turkish bay leaf
6 cups (or more) chicken or vegetable broth
2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives, for garnish

Melt 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon olive oil in a heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add cabbage, sprinkle lightly with salt and freshly ground black pepper and saute until cabbage is almost tender but not brown, 6-8 minutes. Using slotted spoon transfer 1 cup cabbage to small bowl and reserve for garnish.
Add 1 tablespoon butter to pot with cabbage, add leeks and garlic. Saute over medium heat until leeks soften slightly, about 3 minutes. Stir in potatoes, Parmesan rind if desired and bay leaf. Add 6 cups broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer until all vegetables are tender, 20-25 minutes. Discard Parmesan rind, if using, and bay leaf. Let soup cool. If pureeing while still warm, remember to have the center piece out of the top of the blender and hold a kitchen towel over that opening so steam can escape but not the delicious soup. Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return puree to pot. Simmer until heated through, adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls to thin soup to desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper.
Ladle into bowls and garnish with reserved cabbage and chives.
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Though this is definitely a heartier meal, it fits right in with the produce we are receiving right now–zucchini, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and onions. My kids don not appreciate this wonderful recipe but everyone else I have served it to does.

Ratatouille and Sausage Pot Pit with Cornmeal Biscuits (from the New York Times)
Biscuits
1 cup flour
1/2 cup cornmeal
2 teaspoons sugar
1.5 teaspoons baking soda
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons butter in 1/2 inch chunks
3/4 cup sour cream or yogurt
milk

Ratatouille
1 large eggplant, cut into 1 inch chunks
3 small zucchini, cut into 1 inch chunks
7 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 cup chopped parsley or basil
3/4 pound Italian sausage
1 large onion, cut into 1 inch chunks
1 red/yellow/orange or purple sweet pepper, cut into 1 inch chunks
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1.5 pounds tomatoes
4 sprigs thyme
Biscuits-whisk flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Using fork, cut in butter until resembles coarse crumbs. Fold in sour cream. Knead until comes together in a ball adding drop or two of milk if necessary. Cover with plastic wrap until ready to use.
Ratatouille-Toss eggplant and zucchini with 5 tablespoons of olive oil. Season with 3/4 teaspoons salt and 3/4 teaspoons pepper. Spread veggies on baking sheet. Don’t crowd them. Roast, tossing occasionally until golden, about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in a deep saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil. Crumble sausage and cook over medium until done, about 7 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper towel lined plate. Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan. Saute onion, pepper, garlic and 1/4 teaspoon garlic until soft, 5-7 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and thyme. Simmer until tomatoes are cooked and stew-like, about 10 minutes. Stir in sausage, roasted vegetable and parsley. Pour mixture into oven safe dish. Divide dough into 6 balls. Squash into disks (1/2 inch thick). Arrange on top of ratatouille. Brush biscuits with milk. Bake in oven 25-30 minutes.

One more idea for those peppers and eggplants. This is quick, easy and delicious.
Grilled Sweet Peppers and Eggplant
2 sweet peppers, cut into wedges
1 eggplant, 1/2 inch slices
3 tablespoons olive oil plus more for tossing with peppers and eggplant
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon fresh oregano, chopped
1/2 cup feta/goat cheese, crumbled
salt and pepper
Preheat grill. Toss peppers and eggplant with olive oil. Grill about 8-10 minutes. Arrange on a platter. Combine 3 tablespoons olive oil, red wine vinegar and oregano. Pour over peppers and eggplant slices. Crumble goat cheese over veggies. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Holy Basil, Batman!!

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Okay, so I was on a mission to make my annual pesto for the freezer and got a little over ambitious. I was up to my eyeballs in basil. Time for some preservation!

Pesto is, by definition, a sauce originating in Genoa of Northern Italy, made of crushed basil, garlic, pine nuts, olive oil and Parmigiano Reggiano. My definition: a handful of herbs, any allium (garlic/onion variation you like), nuts of your preference, salt, pepper and cheese (dry/strong flavor!). Any variation will do. Make use of all of those beautiful herbs from Groundswell!
Pesto freezes beautifully, so you will have a delicious spread for sandwiches (egg, grilled cheese, any meat) and sauce for pasta, all winter long. Another great way to get your summer-flavor-fix in the dead of winter!

Here are a few thoughts to keep in mind:
– Preservation is best done when produce is freshly picked and at its peak. You have no doubt noticed that there is a limited window of opportunity for some of your favorites (garlic scapes, strawberries, etc). Produce at the market this week will be gone the next, so don’t put off “putting it up” (lingo for canning or preserving fresh produce)!

– I make sure to buy extra garlic and herbs to make about 8-10 jars of pesto; 9 that go right into the freezer and the 10th we eat right away, slathering it on anything stiff enough to take a slathering. However, if you aren’t stockpiling, you can pretty much use the weekly herbs you choose at the pickup, and along with some nuts, cheese and oil you have the makings of a pesto for a fresh veggie/pasta dinner. See Jane’s post from week 4 for a garlic scape recipe and my recipe below for some additional variations.

– Remember, this is about preserving your CSA loot, so be as creative and adapt as needed to make what you have work. Taste as you go, you will be amazed at how impossible it is to make a bad tasting pesto!

– Lastly, one year I completely forgot to throw in my grated cheese and froze the whole batch. A week later when digging around in the fridge, I realized that I never added the cheese. Too late. But, no worries, you can just toss in handfuls of cheese when you pull it out of the fridge and use it in your recipe. See, it really is idiot proof!!

General Pesto Ratio:
1/2 cup pignolis (pine nuts, which can be purchased in large quantity at Costco, or smaller quantities at places like Russo’s)
9 cloves or garlic, or 6-10 garlic scapes (again, don’t get too caught up in the exact quantities, use what you have on hand)
5-6 cups or fresh herbs (you can do the traditional basil, or do combinations of basil, parsley, thyme and oregano, whatever you like)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 cup good olive oil
1 cup of any sharp, dry cheese, grated (use the food processor if you want to speed up the job)
Additional add-ons I have tried and really enjoyed: pistachios, walnuts, lemon juice, hot peppers, and kale

Place the nuts and garlic in the food processor and process for 30 seconds. Add the herbs, salt and pepper process again till the herbs have been chopped down. Slowly pour in the oil, and process until the pesto is the consistency that you enjoy. Finally, add the cheese and pulse a few times to mix it in. Pack it in small jars so you can pull out one jar at a time for meals. Make sure to label the jars with the date and what herb combination you used. Some will go better with fish or a sandwich than others!

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A couple last tips:
– If you enjoy berries in smoothies or for cobblers or pies in the winter, you can easily freeze them for later use. Simply wash, gently spin dry in your salad spinner and lay out on cookie sheets. Put them in your freezer overnight and pack in freezer grade containers/bags and label with the year. I do this with strawberries, cherries and blueberries. The cherries need to be pitted, which can be done easily with a pitter (tool found at D&W, Meijer, etc). We really enjoy the cherries and blueberries straight from the freezer on a hot day. They are sweet little nuggets of cool fruitiness, and a whole lot healthier than popsicles!!

– I also find it very beneficial to stash eight to ten homemade quiche in the freezer as well (I will post more about that in my next week to do the blog, which will be the week of July 21st). I start making them in July and continue thru the end of September. They are a great way to use up excess veggies, cooked down. Just throw in any cheese or cooked meat on hand and you have a meal completed. When I have guests in over the holidays, I pull out the quiche from the freezer at night and the next morning I simply slip it in the oven and pull out some fruit and turn on the coffee machine. Breakfast is served!

Have fun with those veggies, folks! See you in a week.
Lisa McLean

Week 6: Recipe Frenzy!

Hello All,
With the whirl of July 4th last week (lots of cooking in my world!), my head is spinning with new recipes to try and new flavor combinations to explore. Every year about this time I start to work myself into a bit of a recipe tasting & food preservation frenzy! So many good flavor combinations to try and such limited time!! Also, as my freezer is now bare, I am itching to start the preservation process and load it up again with lots of goodies for the winter months. With this in mind, you can expect to see more than one post from me this week, with the intention of passing along recipes for the veggie loot this week, and also some preservation tips/recipes.
Let’s get started with a few basics to prep over the next couple days before pickup.

Balsamic and Herb Vinaigrette
(recipe shared by my fun friend and neighbor, Lisa Fiestritzer)
Makes plenty for 1 to 2 weeks worth of salads. You will run out of greens from the pickup, before running out of the dressing!

This is one of my favorite salad dressings for a bowl of spicy greens such as arugula, and the cucumbers that are starting to arrive. The sweetness of the balsamic balances so nicely with the zing of the greens and the coolness of the cucumbers. Also, you can use almost any herb at the pickup. If you have never made fresh croutons, give them a try. Super easy, and when served warm upon the salad, they soak up the dressing and it is a match made in heaven. If you are reducing/eliminating wheat/bread from your diet, no worries, this salad is still fantastic using just veggies! The salad on the left is a variation using strawberries from last week and almonds, and the salad on the right is a simple mixed greens with feta.

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Dressing:
3Tbs Balsamic vinegar
2 tsp Dijon mustard
1/2 to 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1-1/2 tsp fresh oregano, dill, or basil (you can also use 1/2 tsp dried herbs if you don’t have fresh on hand)
1 clove garlic, peeled and mashed (if you are using scapes, you can skip the garlic, unless you prefer a stronger garlic flavor)
2 tsp minced shallots, garlic scapes, red onion or scallions

Salad fixins’ to consider, but go with what you like!
sliced strawberries and almonds (toasted)
salad mix, arugula or lettuce, washed, spun out and torn
chopped scallions
sliced cucumbers
sliced radishes
Pine nuts (toasted)
Feta, goat or Parmesan cheese
tomatoes or peppers when in season, cut up
bread croutons, fresh, warm, just out of the pan (see recipe below)
If you have a leftover chunk of meat, either chicken or beef, warm it up, slice and add into the mix.

The best way to mix a salad dressing is to start with the balsamic, add the mustard and whisk. Mustard acts as a binder and will allow the oil to incorporate into the vinegar more readily. When adding the oil, start with a couple drops, whisking as you go and slowly pour in the rest, all the while whisking. If you really enjoy the flavor of balsamic, stick to the 1/2 cup measurement of oil. If you prefer your dressing milder, then continue adding the oil, up to 3/4 cup, and taste as you go. When whisked long enough this dressing will become thick and you will notice the oil and vinegar become fully combined. Once you have fully incorporated the oil, add the salt, pepper, fresh/dried herbs, garlic and alliums. This dressing will last for up to 2 weeks in the fridge and gets better as the flavors meld.

Croutons
1 Tbs olive oil
1 Tbs butter
1 tsp salt
1/2 loaf of any bread, cut into small cubes

Heat oil and butter in large skillet, over medium heat. Once the bubbles from the butter stopped sizzling, add the bread cubes and immediately toss them around the pan, making sure they get evenly coated with the butter/oil. Cook over low to medium heat, tossing frequently, for 10 minutes, or until nicely browned. Serve warm, on top of salad and make sure to drizzle some dressing on top of them. These little babies will make any ho-hum salad perk right up. Also, the leftovers can be reheated in the oven the next day and tossed on another salad!

Napa Cabbage and Carrot Slaw with Miso Dressing
(shared by Martha Boks, a good friend and fabulous cook!)
makes 8 servings

napa cabbage

This salad is super easy to make, especially if you prep the dressing and toast the sesame seeds beforehand. Because of the delicate nature of the Napa cabbage, the slaw is best assembled just an hour or two before serving. Also, DO NOT try to cut up the Napa cabbage in your food processor…cabbage juice anyone?!!

Dressing:
1/4 cup rice vinegar
3 Tbs miso, white variety (can be bought at Harvest Health in the fridge where the cheese and milk are located)
3 Tbs grapeseed oil (or canola)
1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
1 Tbs sugar
1 tsp minced garlic

Slaw Ingredients:
2 Tbs sesame seeds
3/4 pound Chinese cabbage, also known as Napa, cut into thin shreds (6 cups)
2 cups grated carrots (I did mine in the food processor with grating blade)
1 large sweet red pepper, sliced into very thin strips or 1 apple, chopped into small pieces
1/2 cup scallions, or chives, sliced

To toast the sesame seeds, heat a small, dry skillet over medium heat. Add sesame seeds and cook, stirring often until lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Remove seeds from pan and allow to cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar, oil, miso, sugar, soy sauce and garlic until well blended. Set aside.

In large serving bowl, mix together the shredded cabbage, carrots red pepper or apple and scallions. Pour the dressing over top and mix till the veggies are all coated. Sprinkle sesame seeds on top and serve.
Notes: The sesame seeds and dressing can be made days in advance. You can also substitutes peanuts for the sesame seeds, toasted in oven on 350 for 10-15 minutes and cooled. They are super hot when they come out of the oven, so don’t let anyone pop a peanut into their mouth!

Cabbage & Noodles
(adapted from Moosewood New Classics)
Serves 4

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This is comfort food at its finest! You will be amazed at how much cabbage you can polish off when served with caramelized onions. Also, it makes a great leftover for the next day. Simply heat on low in a saucepan, adding a dash of water and keeping it on low with a lid. For a gluten-free version, brown rice could be substituted for the noodles.

2 cups thinly sliced onions
1/4 cup unsalted butter
1-1/2 Tbs paprika
8 cups finely shredded green cabbage (equals a medium-size head of cabbage)
2 tsp salt
12 oz. fine or medium wide egg noodles (substitute with rice noodles if you are avoiding gluten)
freshly ground black pepper to taste
dollop of sour cream (optional, but highly recommended!!)

In a large pot (with a tightly fitting lid), first melt the butter, using medium heat. Add the onions and turn down to low, put the lid on and cook for about 15 minutes to obtain a golden color (caramelized), stirring occasionally to prevent them from sticking to the bottom. Add the paprika and sauté for a minute more. It may seem like a lot of paprika, but you will be surprised how mild it will taste. Stir in the cabbage, add the salt and pepper and continue to cook on very low heat for 40-60 minutes, with the lid on, stirring occasionally, until the cabbage is very soft and light brown.

When you still have about 15 minutes left on the clock for the cabbage, cook the noodles in boiling water until al dente. Drain them and when the cabbage is done cooking, add the noodles, tossing to mix well. Serve immediately and add a dollop of sour cream on top of each serving. Delicious!!

After all of those good veggies let’s indulge a bit in dessert! Basil Cheesecake is such a unique twist on a classic dessert. This cheesecake is not overly sweet, in fact it is more on the cheesy side so it really pairs well with fresh fruit of the sweeter kind. Strawberries are a given at this time of the year (provided they are sweet), but do try it when the sweet cherries and blueberries come to market as well. Cheesecake freezes beautifully, so you can make a couple, stash them in the freezer and pull them out later in the summer when the peaches arrive!

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Real Basil Cheesecake
adapted from Madison Herb Society Cookbook
makes 10 servings….or in our case, about 5! We like our cheesecake!

Crust:
1-1/2 cup of crushed graham crackers or crushed crispy cookies (use whatever you have on hand
6 Tbs butter, melted
1 Tbs sugar (if using cookies, sugar is not needed)

Filling:
2 large eggs, room temp
1 cup sour cream
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 cup basil leaves, destemmed
2 Tbs cornstarch
2 Tbs lemon juice
2 tsp vanilla
2 pounds cream cheese, at room temperature

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
To make the crust, combine the graham crackers, melted butter and sugar, mixing until well moistened. Pour into a 9 inch springform pan, and press the crumbs into the bottom of the pan and about 1 inch up the sides, creating a crust. Bake for 8 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

Place the oven rack on the bottom third of the oven. This is important so the top of the cheesecake doesn’t burn or overcook, leaving the inside undercooked. In a food processor, lightly beat the eggs. Add sour cream, sugar, basil, cornstarch, lemon juice, and vanilla. Process until smooth. Add cream cheese, 1/2 pound at a time, and process to incorporate. Pour into cooled crust.

Bake for 1 hour. Open oven and give the pan a slight jiggle to see if the center of the cheesecake moves. If it jiggles a bit, close the door and continue cooking for another 10 minutes. Then pull out and gently run a knife around the edge. Cool on wire rack for 10 minutes and then remove outer ring. Finish cooling, wrap with saran wrap and store in fridge for up to 1 week, or freeze for later use.

Notes: The recipe calls for using a food processor or mixer, but I learned that the food processor does a much better job of chopping up the basil so it texturally works in the cheesecake. The mixer left bigger pieces of basil that were just not right in a cheesecake!
Also, everyone’s oven is different, so use your best judgement on cooking time. If the top of the cheesecake starts to get brown, no worries, pull it out of the oven and insert a toothpick in the center to see if it is done. If so, the brown part can be peeled off. If it is still jiggly in the center you will need to lower the rack and continue to cook. I made the mistake of pulling it out while still jiggly, thinking that it would firm up as it cooled…no such luck. I put it back in for another 20 minutes, checking intermittently. I ended up baking it for a total of 1 hour and 10 minutes. See my photos here of underbaked (left side) and correctly baked (right side). Notice how it looks firmer in the photo on the right side?

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Have fun with your pickup this week and please remember to share any thoughts or recipe favorites you may have with the group! Also, don’t forget to check back this week for some food preservation ideas!
Best regards,
Lisa

Week One Five:Chop and Drop One Pot Wonders and More!

This week we have a fabulous recipe from a special guest blogger:
 
Theresa Z master of letting necessity, intuition, and blind faith take the meal by the spatula.
The scenario: Didn’t have time to take in this week’s share and about 1/2 peck of tomatoes ended up in the fridge (which really diminished their flavor) with a banana pepper, 4 carrots, 1 cup broccoli, a red onion and one wilty bok choy. OY!
 
Step 1: Make Rice! This is always a good starting place with cooking. It gives you a little time to brainstorm and guarantees you won’t  go hungry, even if everything else goes up in flames.*
*Note: if your other dishes do go up in flames, this may affect cooking times. 
 
Step 2: Decide that it’s ok to make two completely distinct meals, and share some for lunches! 
 
Today’s recipes are for: Long Shot Tomato Restoration and Lentil Soup for Later. 
 
Step 3: Bring 2 cups lentils to a boil in 8-10 cups of water or broth. If water, add 2 Tbsp soup base (vegan or chicken stock) when the water is hot, reduce to a simmer and let it be for 30 minutes. 
 
Step 4: This is your opportunity to chop everything up (If you really want to stretch the recipe with soo many vegetables–feel free to add another cup or two of water)
1/2 cup chopped broccoli
1/2 cup variety of pole beans
4 carrots, sliced
1 large heirloom tomato– big pieces
1 large red onion (any onion will do)- chopped as you like
 
Step 5: Saute the onion in a pan with olive oil (on medium heat) till golden.
 
Step 6: Once the lentils are fairly tender (at about 20 min) add broccoli, carrots, beans and cook for a bit til tender as well.
 
Step 7: Turn off the heat and add tomatoes, 1/2 bok choy, and 1/2 of your onion
 
Step 8: Now that you’ve got your lentil soup together–let the tomatoes and bok choy get into the mix and turn your attention to the beautiful chaos that is the “stirfry”
 
Step 9: Forget about Step 8
 
Step 10: To saute onions, ad broccoli, boy choy, and anything else that did not make it into your lentil soup. Chop Up banana pepper/red peppers- toss ’em in. Add as many tomatoes as you can. 
 
Step 11: Add more olive oil to coat veggies and 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar and a dollop of anything fun you can find in the fridge (1 found caramelized onion and cherry chutney! Wow! 2 Tbsp teriyaki (or two shakes ) will do )
You can stop right there, or add all of those  groundswell tomatoes and bring back their amazing Groundswell flavor. 
That’s right, just dump them all in and heat ’em up.
 
Step 12: Don’t forget about the rice! It should be just about perfect for your stovetop masterpiece. 
 
x0x0 ,
the “Chef”
 
I tried the lentil stew and stir fry…AMAZING! Thanks Theresa Z. ! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Katie’s kale with peanut sauce
Katie brought this to the weed & feed this year. It’s lick-the-pan delicious!
recipe from Simply in Season
 
1 medium onion
2-3 cloves garlic minced
In a large soup pot saute in 1 Tbsp oil
 
1 medium tomato (diced; optional)
Add and simmer 2-4 minutes
 
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp salt or to taste
1/8 tsp ground cloves
Add, cook and stir 2 minutes.
 
Kale, 8 cups chopped
1/2 cup water
Add and steam until greens are soft but not mushy. Avoid overcooking. Stir occasionally to coat greens with the spices.
 
2-3 Tbsp chunky peanut butter
1-2 tsp hot water
Combine and add to greens at end of cooking time.
 
Tuscan Style Poached Eggs with Chickpeas
2 Tbs. olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
5 large heirloom tomates, large diced (you can blanch to remove skins if you want) As you can see below I used yellow tomatoes.
1 1/2 cup chickpeas, cooked
1 sprig fresh thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 large farm fresh eggs
1 Tbs. chopped fresh chives 
1 Tbsp chopped basil
Lots of freshly grated Parmesan Cheese
Toasted Pita, for mopping up the tomatoes with 
 
 Heat a 10-inch ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the oil and garlic. Cook the garlic, stirring often, until it begins to turn light golden brown, about 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes and thyme and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes cook down and the sauce thickens slightly, about 12 minutes. Discard the thyme sprigs and season the mixture liberally with salt and pepper. Stir in the chickpeas and simmer until they are heated through. Reserve about one-third of the sauce in a bowl and spread the remaining sauce evenly around the skillet. Reduce the heat to medium low, crack the eggs into the tomato sauce, and lightly spoon the reserved tomato sauce over the whites of the eggs (not on the yolks). Cover the pan and cook for 3 minutes so the eggs set slightly. Uncover the skillet and set it under the broiler until the yolks firm up slightly but are still soft to the touch, about 2 minutes. 
 
Broccoli Salad
recipe adapted from Simply in Season
 
1 head broccoli florets (about 1.5 cups)
handful dried cherries (or cranberries or raisins, but cherries is the best by far)
5 slices Bacon, cooked and crumbled
2 scallions diced or (1/4 cup red onion, chopped)
1/4 cup sunflower seeds (or chopped pecans or both!)
Toss in a bowl
 
Dressing: Whisk together 1/2 cup plain yogurt (or mayo), 1 tbsp sugar, a good drizzle of honey (about 1 tbsp) and  1 tbsp cider vinegar (or red wine vinegar).
 
Pour dressing over salad. Toss to coat. Serve.
 
 
Freezing basil with oil
Tom told me about this method of freezing basil. It’s super quick and easy and eliminates the need to make the whole pesto recipe now…
Per plastic lined muffin tin (see picture):  in a food processor add 4 cups basil, pulse to combine. Drizzle in 1/2 cup olive oil with motor running. Place the pesto in the muffin tin cup and cover with plastic wrap. Repeat with remaining basil. Pop this in the freezer. When frozen, unwrap and place in a zip lock bag.
Now you just have to take out one and add the remaining pesto ingredients as you want through the winter!
This can also be done in ice cube trays without the plastic wrap, but I couldn’t find mine.
 
Minestrone
recipe adapted from The New Moosewood Cookbook
 
 
2 tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
splash of dry white wine (about 1/4 cup), optinal
3 cloves garlic, minced
salt and pepper
1 stalk celery, minced
2 carrots, diced
1 summer squash or zucchini, diced
1 medium sized eggplant, diced
2 tsp fresh oregano, minced
1 tbsp basil, stacked rolled and thin sliced
1 red bell pepper, diced
8 oz mushrooms, sliced
handful green beans, ends trimmed, chopped
5 cups water (more if desired)
30 oz tomato sauce (or puree) about 4 cups
1.5 cups cooked beans   such as chickpeas, kidney beans, adzuki beans…
1 cup dry small pasta  such as shell
minced parsley
 
Heat olive oil in a dutch oven. Add onion, garlic, celery, and carrot salt and saute over medium heat for ab0ut 10 minutes. Splash in some white wine, if desired. Add eggplant, bell pepper, zucchini, mushrooms, oregano and basil. Saute a few more minutes. Add water and tomato sauce. Cover and simmer 5 minutes. Add green beans and cooked beans. Simmer another 5 minutes. Bring soup to a boil, add pasta, stir and cook until pasta is tender. Sprinkle with parsley and parmesan cheese.
You can freeze this as well.
 
Parsley Root Lentil Stew
So, parsley root is parsley on top and parsnip root on bottom (basically, in a cooking sense anyway). It’s best to remove the parsley from the top when you get home to maintain freshness.
recipe adapted from Mariquita Farm
 
1 lb  Dried lentils, -washed and drained
2 tbsp bacon drippings, -or oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 parsley root or parnsip, chopped
3 md Carrots, sliced
1 c  Sliced fennel or  celery
2 medium potatoes, cubed
1 lb smoked -sausage, chopped
8 c  Broth (or Water)
1 t Salt to or to taste
Several whole black pepper-corns
2  Whole cloves
2  Bay leaves
In a large pot, heat fat and add carrots, root vegetable, onions and celery. Saute until onions are golden. Add potatoes and sausage. Saute until sausage begins to brown. Add lentils, water, and seasonings. Simmer covered 1 hour until lentils and vegetables are tender. Remove bay leaves.  Serve with a crusty bread and salad. 
This is great frozen and pulled out in the dead of winter!
 
Caponata
This Sicilian Dish is one of my all time favorite late summer dishes: sweet, salty, sour, and a hint of bitterness, what’s not to love. All parts of your palette are touched upon each bite. Great over grilled bread, on crackers, served with polenta and my favorite way is tossed with pasta and topped with cheese.
 
2 tablespoons olive oi
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced
1 green pepper, seeded and diced
1 hot pepper, seeded and chopped
1 large sweet onion, peeled and chopped
1 rib celery, chopped
1 medium firm eggplant, diced
1/2 cup large green olives, pitted and chopped
1/2 cup Kalamata black olives, pitted and chopped
1 3 oz  jar capers, drained
3/4 cup golden raisins
Salt, Pepper
1 quart dice tomatoes (or 4 cups fresh tomatoes, skinned, blanched and chopped)
2 large fresh tomatoes, chopped
1 handful flat-leaf parsley, chopped
Place your cutting board near the stovetop. Preheat a big, deep pot over medium heat. Add oil. As you chop vegetables (peppers, onion, and celery), add them to the pot. Add eggplant and garlic last. Once vegetables are in there, increase heat a bit. Stir in olives, capers, and raisins. Add tomatoes to the pot and stir caponata well to combine. Cover pot and cook caponata 15 to 20 minutes, until vegetables are tender. Stir in parsley and remove pan from heat.
 
 
If you are making Caponata Pasta Bake: while cooking veg, cook pasta (I like Rigatoni or Penne). When Caponata and Pasta are cooked, stir together and place in a 9x13pan. Top with slices of provolone cheese (8oz). Place in a preheated oven until the cheese melts. YUM
 
Polenta Bake
I do so love making fresh creamy polenta (recipe coming soon), but during the busy weeknights, I admit to sometimes buying the premade tubed polenta.This is a great hearty quick weeknight dish!
1 16oz tube refrigerated prepared polenta, cut into 1/4 inch thick slices
1 package Italian Sausage, Casings removed
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 green bell pepper
1 red bell pepper
1 red or white onion
8oz sliced mushrooms, optional
2 large garlic cloves
Fresh chopped oregano
1 quart diced tomatoes (or 4 cups fresh tomatoes, blanched, peeled and chopped)
2 Tbsp tomato paste
8oz shredded mozzarella
Preheat Oven to 450 degrees
Arrange polenta slices in the bottom of a 9×13 pan coated with cooking spray (or oil). Bake the polenta slices 4 minutes, flip and bake another 4 minutes.
Coat a large skillet with a little oil over medium high heat. Add the sausage and fennel seeds. Cook for a few minutes until sausage is just beginning to brown. Add the peppers and onion, cook until beginning to soften. Add mushrooms and cook. Add garlic and saute 1 minute. Add oregano, tomatoes and tomato paste. Cook until sauce is heated through and beginning to thicken.
Pour sauce over polenta and top with cheese. Place in the oven until cheese is melted.
 
Stella’s Polish Sauerkraut
1 lb bacon, sliced into strips
1 onion, sliced thin
1 large head of cabbage, shredded thin
1 quart sauerkraut (recipe coming soon)
2 cups chicken broth
1 lb kielbasa, sliced into bite sized chunks
Cook the bacon and onions in a large pot until cooked through. Start adding the cabbage.  Let cook for awhile until all is cooked down. Add the kielbasa and allow to brown a bit. Now add the sauerkraut and chicken broth. Let simmer at least 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
This can be frozen after cooked and cooled.
 
Slow Roasted Tomatoes
 
Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Halve 10 medium sized tomatoes (plum sized). Arrange tomatoes cut side up, in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with 1 tsp sugar.  Roast 1 hour 30 minutes. At the end turn on the broiler and cook until just starting to char a very little.
 
Serving Suggestion: cook 1/2 lb gemelli pasta. In a fry pan coated with oil add 1 small diced onion, 1 minced garlic clove, and 2 oz chopped dry cured meat (such as salami) optional cook until onion is translucent and salami is crisp. Toss the slow roasted tomatoes into the pan and let simmer a few minutes. Toss this with the pasta and top with a generous heap of parmesan cheese. If basil is available, this is great on top as well with a squeeze of fresh lemon.
 
Oven Dried Tomatoes
Cut small tomatoes in half. Place halves on a rack over a baking sheet, make sure it doesn’t overlap. Sprinkle with a little kosher salt. Place in a 140 degree oven that has a dehydration mode (or in a dehydrator tray). 
Now the time will vary. I’ve had it take 9 hours once and up to 12 hours. I like to put them in before going to bed. The tomatoes will be dry, wrinkly and shriveled.
Store in a tighly sealed bag or in oil. Store the oil in the fridge. 
 
*Often while I am drying tomatoes, I’ll throw in a few herbs. Herbs only take and hour or two in. Remove the leaves from the stems, crumble, and place in a spice jar. 
 
Freezing Greens
It’s super easy to freeze greens. Simply remove thick stems. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Drop the greens in the pot. Simmer 2 minutes. Cool quickly (I run cold water over the greens). Dry (I place them in a strainer and then in a clean kitchen towel). Place in a freezer bag. Label. Lie the bag flat in the freezer. 
 
 
 

Week 7: hot hot hot!

Many Thanks to Katie, Tom and the super fab farm crew for providing us with AMAZING veggies to prepare flavorful healthful food. 
 
Broccoli Green Onion Puree Soup
adapted from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone by Deborah Madison
Simple Quick Soup that can be served hot, warm, or chilled (my favorite is chilled this time of year). I love recipes with just a few ingredients that really allow the flavors of the fresh vegetables to shines.
1 bay leaf
salt and pepper
1 head broccoli, florets cut off, stems peeled and chopped small 
4 large green onions, including 3 inches of the greens, chopped
2 Tbsp butter
pinch of fresh grated nutmeg
juice of 1 lemon
 
 Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil with bay leaf in a stock pot. Add 1 tsp salt, broccoli, and scallions. Cook until tender 6-8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, scoop vegetables into bowl of a food processor. Reserve cooking liquid. Puree in food processor. Add a ladle of cooking liquid until you reach desired consistency (I like it pretty thick). Stir in butter, salt  &pepper to taste, nutmeg, and desired amount of lemon juice (I use the entire lemon). 
Chill and serve with cheesy green onion biscuits. Makes a great lunch! 
 
 Cheesy Green Onion Drop Biscuits
So even after making a soup of green onions and broccoli, I still had some green onions left… decided to make some easy one bowl drop biscuits to go with the chilled soup above.
2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 Tbsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp baking soda
3 Tbsp chilled butter, cut into small pieces
1 cup shredded cheese (I’ve used white cheddar, alpine style (gruyere or swiss), and gouda with sucess)
2 large green onions, chopped white and green parts
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup sour cream
Bacon fat or butter, optional
kosher salt for sprinkling, optional
 
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 
Combine first 4 ingredients in a large bowl. Stir with a whisk to combine. Cut in butter with a pastry blender, 2 knives, or using your fingers gently blend in butter until course meal. Fold in cheese and onions. Add buttermilk and sour cream. Stir just until all is moist. Do not over stir. 
Drop by approximately 1/4-1/2 cup fulls onto greased baking sheet.  (Don’t worry about getting these perfectly round, rustic is good)
 
 
Bake 13-16 minutes until edges are golden brown. 
When the biscuits are still warm, brush on a small dollop of butter or bacon fat and sprinkle with kosher salt or garlic salt. This is completely optional. 
Makes approximately 10-12 biscuits. 
 
 
 
 
Jamaican Vegetable Curry 
One day I was out of curry powder and found this recipe for Jamaican Curry. I do like making my own curry powder blends, the flavors are far superior to some found in the store…plus there are many different varieties of spices to blend together to create all kinds of different curries. 
This is a super versatile recipe, you can add or omit other summer and fall veggies as you desire. When shelling peas are around, they make a great addition. I have added cubed eggplant and parsnips before as well.  I personally like it best when cauliflower is around.
 
1 onion, chopped
2 Tbsp oil (I used safflower, vegetable oil would work also)
1-2 Tbsp Jamaican Curry Powder (see recipe below)
2 (14oz) cans coconut milk
1 head broccoli, florets only (reserve stems for peeling, chopping and adding to stir fry or coleslaw)
1 head cauliflower, chopped
1 bunch radishes, quartered 
3 carrots, chopped (don’t bother peeling them)
large handful spinach, chard, and/or radish leaves
2 dried hot peppers or hot pepper flakes, optional
sriracha, optional
1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped
2 limes, if desired
Cooked rice (I use brown basmati)
 
In a dutch oven heat the oil over medium high heat. Add onions, salt and pepper and cook until translucent and soft. Add curry powder (I like a lot, I added about 1 Tbsp to start, you can always add more later if desired) and stir constantly for a few minutes. Add coconut milk and vegetables (except peas and greens if using). Stir in sriracha and crumbled hot peppers if desired. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 12-15 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add spinach or chard and peas if using. Cook until greens are wilted. Remove from heat. Taste, adjust seasonings as needed. 
Serve over rice. Garnish with cilantro and give the dish a squeeze of fresh lime juice. 
 
 
Jamaican Curry Powder
This makes quite a lot. Store in an airtight container for several months. 
 
0.5 ounce coriander seeds
1 ounces cumin seeds
1/2 Tablespoon poppy seeds
1/2 Tablespoon brown mustard seeds
0.5 ounce peppercorns
dash of ground clov
1 ounces ground tumeric
0.5 ounce ground ginger
 
Toast the corainder, cumin, poppy, and mustard seeds in frying pan until the mustard seeds begin to “jump about and pop”. Cool slightly. Grind w/peppercorns in a mortar or coffee grinder, and mix with tumeric, clove and ginger.
 
 
 
Beet Greens & Goat Cheese Sandwich
I (along with many others) am fully convinced that beets and their greens, goat cheese, and balsamic vinegar were meant to go together. I added a slice of alpine style cheese for flavor and melting quality, but feel free to omit this and the sandwich will be great still! 
 
2 scapes, chopped (or 1 garlic clove miced)
1 tbsp olive oil
beet greens from 3 beets thick, stems removed and greens sliced thick
1-2 tsp balsamic vinegar
2 tbsp goat cheese
2 slices slice of alpine style cheese: comte, gruyere, or swiss
2 buns
Preheat broiler.
Place buns on a baking sheet outside facing up (non cut side). Place under broiler until lightly toasted on the outside. Flip and place cheese slices on 1/2 of bun and goat cheese on other 1/2. Place bake under broiler until cheese slice is melted and beginning to brown (Goat cheese will not brown).
Meanwhile, Place a medium sized skillet over medium high heat. Add olive oil, sauté scape 2-3 minutes (or garlic clove 30 seconds). Add greens, salt and pepper. Saute 3-4 minutes until greens are wilted and release moisture. Continue to cook until some of the moisture is gone. Sprinkle with balsamic vinegar. Toss. Place on bun over cheese. Yum!
 
Arugula Bread Salad with Cherries & Goat Cheese
A coworker was raving about this salad one day at work, so I decided to give it a try. I have also been raving about it ever since making it!! Quick make this before cherry season is over!! Check out Caroline’s blog for the inspiration of this salad… and more on this dish (plus her blog is completely amazing!). 
 
Bread Cubes:
1/2 demi baguette, cut into 1/2 in slices
olive oil
Place bread cubes on a baking sheet. Drizzle on Olive Oil to gently goat and tosss. Bake 15-20 minutes.
Meanwhile prepare the below ingredients and dressing:
 
1 cup cherries, pitted & chopped in 1/2
 
2 cups Arugula
 
2 oz goat cheese, crumbled
 
Balsamic vinaigrette : 1 tbsp balsamic, a small drizzle honey, squirt of dijon mustard, salt, pepper, 3 tbsp safflower oil. Place all in a jar with tight fitting lid. Shake to combine.
 
Toss arugula with 1-2 Tbsp Balsamic Vin (or more to taste). Fold in cherries, bread cubes, and top with goat cheese.  Taste. Adjust seasonings, add more balsamic vin if desired.
 As Caroline suggested, I enjoyed this salad with a chilled glass of Riesling…so fine!
 
Harvest Cream Cheese Spread
Sooo much better than the store bought garden vegetable spread. Great on crackers or on a toasted bagel sandwich with sliced cucumber and radish (and maybe a slice of smoked salmon or turkey too!).
 
4 oz cream cheese, room temp
1 carrot, chopped
1 large green onion (white and green part), chopped
1 garlic clove
5 basil leaves
Salt & pepper
In the bowl of a food processor, add carrot, green onion, garlic clove, and basil. Whirl to mince, scrapping down sides as necessary. When all is minced, add cream cheese and pulse to combine. Add salt and pepper as desired.
 
Sugar Snap Peas Almandine
 
1 qt sugar snap peas, snap off stem end and pull string down the length of the pea
1-2 Tbsp olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup slivered almonds
1/2 lemon, juiced
 
Heat a large skillet over medium high heat. Add olive oil and snap peas with salt and pepper. Toss to coat in oil and sauté 5-7 minutes or until nearly reaching desired degree of tenderness (do not overcook, the peas should have a slight crunch yet be cooked through). Add garlic cloves and slivered almonds, stir constantly to keep the almonds moving for 2-3 minutes. When you can smell the almonds and they begin to turn a light golden brown, remove the pan from heat. Add fresh squeezed lemon juice and stir.
 
 *I served the sugar snap peas with Spiced Shrimp cooked in Avocado Oil: Take 20 small shrimp deveined, tail left on, 2 chopped garlic scapes (or 1 minced garlic clove) and toss with 1/2 tsp chili powder, 1/2 tsp cumin, salt and pepper. Heat 1-2 tbsp avocado oil over medium high heat in a sauté pan. Add shrimp and scapes and toss to coat in oil. Sauté 4-5 minutes or until cooked through.
 
Mustard Green and Kale Ragu
If you are fortunate enough to still have a few jars of tomatoes in your pantry, this is a great way to use them up before tomatoes start rolling in. If  you don’t have any left, save this recipe for fall! 
 
1lb Italian Sausage
1 tbsp Bacon Fat, or oil
Small onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 bunch mustard greens, thick stems removed, stacked, rolled and sliced 1/2 thick
7 kale leaves, thick stems removed, stacked, rolled and sliced 1/2 thick
handful of basil leaves, stacked, rolled and sliced 1/4 thick
2 jars canned tomatoes, drained
1-2 Tbsp fresh oregano, chopped fine
italian seasoning, if desired
salt, pepper
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
1 lb Pasta (I used Penne)
dried Cayenne Pepper, optional
 
Heat bacon fat in medium sized dutch oven. Add Italian Sausage, cook over medium high heat until browned. Add onions and cook over medium high heat until translucent about 5-7 minutes. Add greens, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook until greens begin to wilt, about 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, basil, oregano, and other seasonings. Cover and simmer 30-40 minutes
until greens are tender and sauce is reduced by 1/3.
While sauce simmers, cook pasta. 
Toss sauce with pasta. Stir in parmesan cheese.
 Serve with  additional parm cheese and crushed dried cayenne pepper, if desired. 

 
Preserving Broccoli by blanching and freezing:
 
Step 1: Cut florets off broccoli, reserve stems for another use (such as stirfry)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Step 2: Place florets in a bowl of salted water (1 tbsp or so of salt in a large bowl)
 
 
 
 
Step 3: Bring a large pot of water to the boil.
 
 
 
Step 4: Add florets to the boiling water. Boil 2-4 minutes (time starts once the water has retuned to a boil)
 
 
 
 
 
Step 5: Plunge the broccoli into ice water to stop the cooking process. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Step 6: Drain the broccoli
 
 
 
 
 Step 7: When the broccoli is fairly dry (you may place florets on a towel to dry, but I skip this step), place in a zip lock freezer bag.
 
Step 8: label and freeze
 
Step 9: In January or February pull out of freezer and pop into  vegetable soup, make chicken broccoli casserole,  broccoli quiche…
 
 
 

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About Us

Groundswell Community Farm grows over 40 different crops and 200+ varieties, to provide our CSA members and Michigan restaurants with an amazing array of colorful and flavorful veggies.

Copyright © 2019 Groundswell Community Farms. All rights reserved. Site by CurlyHost.

Groundswell Community Farm grows over 40 different crops and 200+ varieties, to provide our CSA members and Michigan restaurants with an amazing array of colorful and flavorful veggies.

Copyright © 2019 Groundswell Community Farms. All rights reserved. Site by CurlyHost.